Louise Denton Photography

photography

Table Top Track - Litchfield National Park

Darwin and the Norther..., TravelLouise Denton

A run down day-today of my experience of the Table Top Track in Litchfield National Park August 2015 including some images from the walk.

I've just returned from hiking the Table Top Track in Litchfield. The hike is a 39km, multi-day bushwalk, in a loop around the tabletop of Litchfield National Park.

We chose to complete the walk in four days, leaving early from Florence Falls on Saturday morning.

The Tabletop Track can be accessed by one of four different link walks; Florence Falls (approx 1.8km to the tabletop), Walker Creek, Wangi Falls or Greenant Creek (6.3km and very difficult from what I hear). We walked anti-clockwise and ended the walk back at Florence Falls on Tuesday…..

Post Processing Workflow (2)

Tutorials and TipsLouise Denton

It's been a while since I posted a work-through of a particular photo. My processing techniquye and style has probably evolved quite a bit since then, so I thought it time to do another one.

This example is slightly different in that I'm going to use two versions of the same image, to blend together for a correct and balanced exposure. The image below is probably not the best example of when and why to blend two images together - the image below is more so just to show the technique….

Jatbula Trail - Part 3

Darwin and the Norther..., TravelLouise Denton

Day 4 was the big day on the Jatbula trail - 17km. The walk was broken up in to two chunks, 12km and 5km with a stop at Edith River crossing after the first 12km. We got through the first 12km a supersonic speed and arrived at Edith River crossing when we thought we still had 3km to go. A lovely shady spot for lunch with a chance for a cool off! The first 12km on this day was an easy walk - flat and good terrain. The remaining 5km proved to be a little trickier…

TIPS | Graduated Neutral Density filters?

Tutorials and TipsLouise Denton

What is a Graduated Neutral Density (GND) filter? How would I use one?

GND filters are a square or rectangular filter.

They are 50% dark grey, and 50% clear.

The dark grey half will reduce the brightness over the area it is positioned, whilst maintaining an exposure for the clear part.

GND filters are useful for sunset photography as they darken out a bright sky…

TIPS | Getting the sharpest image quality

Tutorials and TipsLouise Denton

There are two things I believe are the most important things to get right, in camera. The first is composition, you can't change that in post-processing aside from a little cropping. The only way to stop elements "overlapping" in a photo (e.g. no tree coming out of a persons' head, etc) is to move your feet and camera at the time of the shot.

The other most important thing to get right in camera is…

TIPS | Photographing Darwin's waterfalls | PART 1

Travel, Tutorials and TipsLouise Denton

The country surrounding Darwin has more than its fair share of waterfalls. Our landscape is patterned with rivers and rapids, gorges and escarpment. Our landscape goes through extreme seasonal changes: whilst our waterfalls are perfect for a refreshing dip in the dry season (as long as they are crocodile free, of course), they become a deathly torrent of raging flood waters in the wet season. Our waterfalls are some of our most loved attractions - loved by tourists and locals alike. So how do you go about photographing these natural wonders….

Those that got away July & August 2013

Darwin and the Norther...Louise Denton

June and July were pretty quiet months for me in terms of getting out and taking photos: not only am I very busy with the tourist season and making stock for markets, but we are also nearing the "biggest" part of our house renovations - the kitchen! We've been working hard to get ourselves a working kitchen, and we are still going..... the end is now in sight, so another few weeks and the house should be complete.

Because of that, it's been impossible to find time to get further afield for photo exploring (boo hoo). I've been staying fairly local. And unfortunately the sunsets in my opinion are a little more "uninspiring" at this time of year. The sun goes down, and that's that. Wet season is a million times better for sunset photography - every Darwin sunset in the wet season is different! Rain, cloud, red cloud, passing showers, blue clouds - fast clouds, slow clouds, fluffy clouds, smooth clouds....! I like clouds :)

But now.... Now things are improving! Even a couple of showers. Already!!

Anyway, because of my slow photo-taking around Darwin this last couple of months, I have grouped the July and August unseen photographs together. Trust me, as the storms build up and the skies get crazy, the tourists slow down and the lightning comes out.... I will be out at least once a day and there will be a lot of photos!!

Long after the sun disappeared below the horizon, Nightcliff Foreshore

A couple of sunset watchers relax with dinner, looking over Nightcliff Jetty

An evening sea kayaker at East Point

One lonely yacht against a smoky dry season sunset sky (Fannie Bay)

A couple of mangroves at Lameroo Beach, right in the Darwin CBD

An interesting looking tree, with a whistling kite, at Lee Point. I need to revisit this tree with an awesome sky and a low tide

Black and white, or colour? For the below:

Managed one short boat trip out to Corroboree Billabong this month. More a trip for the rellies though, than a photo outing. Found a few crocs though!

A recent sunrise - looking back toward Nightcliff Pool

Magnetic Termite mounds, against a charred backdrop - exploring the rural area!

The sunrises are starting to improve!!

One of my favourite trees, unfortunately on a bland background.....

One of my new favourite spots, I think! The following three photos are from Berry Springs, NT.

berry springs vertical copy berry sp copy berry sp roots2

Lemon Bellied Flycatcher

Vestey's Beach, sunset

These shots have not been published online anywhere else, so if you have any comments on any of the photos, please feel free to reply to my post below!

To see the other photos I upload regularly, find me on Facebook - "Louise Denton Photography"

If you make it to Darwin, NT, Australia, be sure to say g'day in my market stall at Mindil Beach Markets or Parap markets!

Have a great weekend. :)

TIPS | Seeing Stars?

Darwin and the Norther..., Tutorials and TipsLouise Denton

A few of you who follow me on Facebook or Flickr will see I've had a couple of recent attempts at taking photos of the stars. This was all sparked by me hearing about the Perseid Meteor Shower. I've never heard of it before this year - it is an annual shower, that provides regular and spectacular meteors for us viewing down here on Earth. Every year it peaks around the 11th of August, and I decided to try and catch my own meteor on camera.


TIPS | Composition for landscape photography

Tutorials and Tips, UncategorizedLouise Denton

The biggest mistakes made by beginners starting out in landscape photography, are in composition. In my opinion, it is one of the most important things to get right "in camera". Composition (aside from a little cropping) cannot be fixed in post processing. Nothing you do on the computer is going to change how you arranged the scene in the viewfinder.

Tweaks can be made, of course - e.g. cloning out intrusive branches or straightening the horizon but generally, composition must be right at the time of the shot.


Kakadu National Park

Darwin and the Norther..., UncategorizedLouise Denton

I've visited Kakadu quite a few times over the last few years, but I don't think I'll ever get bored of exploring the area and taking photos! Escarpment country, near Jim Jim Falls, Kakadu

I recently traveled out to the park because Jim Jim Falls had just opened for the dry season. Despite seeing the "falls" three times, I've never seen it flowing due to visiting too late in the dry season. So this trip was all about the "stone country" region, the region of Kakadu characterised by red, sandstone escarpment and gorges.

Jim Jim is the tallest falls accessible in Kakadu - a 200 metre high escarpment - which in the wet season is a spectacular, fast-flowing flood of water. As this falls is not spring-fed and only rain-fed, it dries up late in the dry season. Unfortunately in the wet season, when the falls are at their most impressive, road and walking access become impossible due to the amount of rain that floods the region. I'm hoping to do a scenic helicopter flight next season, but for now I was very happy with the amount of water still flowing from the escarpment.

We arrived at Garnamarr campground around 4pm, set up camp and headed straight down the 4WD track to check out the falls and escarpment in the sunset light. I wasn't disappointed! The gorge-like landscape is stunning, and I was surprised to see so much water still flowing. The light got better and better as the sun dipped below the hills behind me.

Jim Jim Falls

The light seemed to be most evenly spread after the sun had gone down, and the escarpment country glowed bright red. The below photo is a composition of 3 photos, to even out the exposure in some dark shadows and too-bright-highlights. The main photo was taken at ISO 100, f13 and 4 seconds, with an area of bright sky above the cliffs brushed in, and the area on the left with the darker trees brushed in too.

Escarpment glowing in the last light, Jim Jim Falls

Last light shining on the escarpment at Jim Jim falls

We also visited the falls the next morning too, to check out the light. The escarpment did not appear to glow as red, but it was still spectacular in a different way: hazy and mystical - well worth the early (cold!) morning.

The flow of Jim Jim Falls, Kakadu

The next afternoon we headed to Maguk - a waterfall I was convinced we had previously visited, but on arrival we realised we hadn't! The time we visited was not ideal for photography as the light was harsh around midday, but I think the falls itself would be very difficult to photograph at either sunrise or sunset due to it's position.

Maguk falls and plunge pool, Kakadu National Park

The walk to Maguk pool was lovely too, following a creek up to the falls. The creek and backdrop of red, rocky hills would make for some great landscape photography at a better time for light (although I would have to revisit to figure out what that time would be!).

Cascading waters down red rocks in a creek on the way to Maguk waterfall, Kakadu

We headed to Gunlom waterfall to camp and stay the night. This place is one of my favourite places to swim - the steep walk to the top of the falls is well worth it! Walkers are greeted with a series of natural rock pools, which end in nature's own infinity pool, looking out in to the vast open landscape of Kakadu.

Unfortunately, this time we did not have time to venture to the top of Gunlom waterfall. Instead, I explored the bottom pools, and photographed the very small trickle left over from the wet seasons rain.

Gunlom waterfall viewing platform, Kakadu

Last light reflections at Gunlom plunge pool

The falls were only a trickle, but luckily there were a few other interesting areas to keep me occupied with the camera!

This tree stands in the plunge pool at Gunlom, and made for a few interesting shots.

Tree against the dark cliff backdrop

Crystal clear water :)

A shady, clear, place to swim!

Monitor Lizard

My partner and I are thinking about revisiting again for another quick visit to Kakadu next week! I love getting out there, just wish I could spend longer. The next trip we will probably take the boat, so I can try my hand at some more bird/wildlife shots on Yellow Waters. I could already do a long photo essay on Yellow Waters - it's probably my favourite place to relax in the Top End.

More to come soon, hope you liked them! Let me know what you think... I think my favourite photo I took this trip is of Jim Jim Falls, with the reflections of the red cliff tops. :-)